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Starting to actually feel like a home.

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Kitchen in Progress

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Writing Every Day

Writing every day is hard. You have to carve out the space for it. You can’t just try to fit in some writing when time’s available–you have to dedicate time to it and structure everything else around that.

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Readmill Closes

A few days ago, Readmill—by far the best ebook reading experience I have used to date—announced that they are shutting down after being acquired by Dropbox.

Although I used it for the impeccable typography and attention to detail in the reading experience, I also came to love the idea of a service backing my reading. I didn’t care about the social features, but two touches stood out for me: estimated reading time remaining, and having a record of the books I’ve read. The last item is especially important for things as ephemeral as ebooks, since we don’t have physical items on a shelf to serve as markers of things we’ve read.

It’s almost enough to make me want to learn iOS programming to make my ideal ebook reader that won’t be subject to the whims of business models and acquisitions.

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Subversion Project Switches to Git

Yesterday, the Subversion project announced that they were moving development of Subversion itself to Git. It was, unsurprisingly, an April Fool’s prank, but the level of detail in the ticket’s comments was pretty convincing—I definitely fell for it.

But really, the joke’s on them, since it’s so eminently plausible to want to switch to Git from Subversion. Nobody uses Subversion because they want to: they’re prisoners of legacy systems. And anyone who actually claims to love Subversion must have Stockholm Syndrome.

I see this at Automattic, where we use Subversion. There’s a lot of agitation for a move to Git, but Etsy’s Git migration shows that this can be a huge project. Still, I’m seeing a lot of people internally move outside of the standard Subversion workflow, embracing either a “work in Git, deploy to SVN” workflow, or even fully embracing GitHub as the primary development platform, like Jetpack.1

Although some people find Git confusing at first, that’s usually because they’re looking at it through Subversion-tinted glasses. We have one internal project using GitHub that many of our designers are collaborating on, and they got up and running with a branch and merge workflow almost painlessly. It’s been fantastic for collaboration on a fast-moving project that would have been basically impossible if we hadn’t been using Git.


  1. Although they still have to sync back and forth with WordPress.com’s SVN setup. 
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Running in the snow has an eerie quality to it.

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Winter Running

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